Baty.net

The personal weblog of Jack Baty

The History of Email - Eager Blog

Zack Bloom:

The ancestors of the Internet were kind enough to give us a communication standard which is free, transparent, and standardized. It would be a shame to see the tech communication landscape move further and further into the world of locked gardens and proprietary schemas.

A fun history of one of the most ubiquitous communication mechanisms ever.

I love email. It’s easy, lightweight, and encapsulates a universal-ness that has never been surpassed. Having all that means I can live with the parts that suck (e.g. spam and encryption). It’s fun and popular to hate on email, but I have years of messages living in a directory of simple text files, forever accessible and all mine.

Hugo

notes.baty.net is entirely unnecessary. I should just post everything at https://baty.net. Except I enjoy having a static blog and using Hugo to publish a bunch of simple markdown files. So here we are again.

Gitlab

I just moved a few of my projects to Gitlab. I did this for no particular reason other than I enjoy trying new things and perhaps Github is getting a little big for their britches. Alternatives are a good thing.

Motivation, what?

I’ve always been terrible at finishing things, but lately I don’t even feel like starting anything. Maybe it would be easier if I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up.

Ulysses 2.6 and WordPress

They told me that Ulysses 2.6 could post directly to my WordPress blog, so I upgraded, entered my WordPress settings, typed this entry and hit “Publish”.

They were right!

Review: The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century

The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist's Companion for the 21st Century

The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century by Richard Polt

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’ll probably read any new book about typewriters. It’s nice to even have them. “The Typewriter Revolution” was thorough and informative. I could have done without the “Insurgency!” bits and probably didn’t need the defensiveness around typists being called “hipsters”. Otherwise, a fun read.

View all my reviews

Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 AI-s

Nikon 28mm

Nikon Nikkor 28mm f/2.8

I tend to avoid wide lenses. I find them difficult to shoot. Robert Capa said, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” and getting close enough is a challenge for me.

Using an iPhone has helped train me to get closer and better “eyeball” a scene for wider shots, so I picked up a 28mm lens for the Nikon F3. Here are a couple from the first roll. I’m going to need some practice, but it seems like a very fine lens.

Jessica. Nikon F3. Nikkor 28mm f/2.8. Tri-X in D-76 1:1

Jessica. Nikon F3. Nikkor 28mm f/2.8. Tri-X in D-76 1:1

Jess, Dad, Brandon, Kelly golfing.  Nikon F3. Nikkor 28mm f/2.8. Tri-X in D-76 1:1

Jess, Dad, Brandon, Kelly golfing. Nikon F3. Nikkor 28mm f/2.8. Tri-X in D-76 1:1

 

Which is better, iOS or macOS?

It’s a silly question, but I know the answer.

The answer is that the one I want to be better is better.

See Dr. Drang and Ben Brooks and Watts Martin for recent examples of this discussion. There are many more.

For the record I find iOS to be fun but macOS to be more useful for nearly everything. I guess I’ll always need a truck. Maybe I’m just an old dog.

I did enjoy Brooks explaining away the difficulties with iOS (“Ease has nothing to do with it”), and then later saying, “Give it time”, bringing it nicely back to the Desktop Linux argument.

I can’t predict whether people like Federico Viticci are pioneers or outliers. Time will tell.

Steve

Steve (2016). Nikon F3. 50mm f/1.4. Tri-X in D-76 1:1 9 min.

Steve (2016). Nikon F3. 50mm f/1.4. Tri-X in D-76 1:1 9 min.

I love this shot of Steve. It’s a candid shot that doesn’t look candid.